Extreme Weather Precautions

Warming Centers Schedule for Extreme Cold Event, Jan. 30 - Feb. 2

Click for details

Resources for Extreme Cold

Dress Warmly and Stay Dry - Dress in Layers

  1. Inner Layer: Wear fabrics that will hold more body heat and don’t absorb moisture. Wool, silk, or polypropylene will hold more body heat than cotton.
  2. Insulation Layer: An insulation layer will help you retain heat by trapping air close to your body. Natural fibers, like wool, goose down, or a fleece work best.
  3. Outer Layer: The outermost layer helps protect you from wind, rain, and snow. It should be tightly woven, and preferably water and wind resistant, to reduce loss of body heat.

Staying Safe Before & After a Winter Storm

Information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Know the signs of frostbite and hypothermia

Avoid, Spot and Treat Hypothermia and Frostbite

Hypothermia

Hypothermia (abnormally low body temperature) is a dangerous condition that can happen when a person is exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

In adults, warning signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion or feeling very tired, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. In babies, signs include bright red, cold skin, and very low energy.

If you notice any of these signs, take the person’s temperature. If it is below 95° F, the situation is an emergency—get medical attention immediately.

Frostbite

Frostbite is a type of injury caused by freezing. It can lead to a loss of feeling and color in the areas it affects, usually the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, and toes.  Frostbite can permanently damage the body, and severe cases can lead to amputation (removing the affected body part).

Signs of frostbite include a white or grayish-yellow skin area, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, and numbness. If you notice signs of frostbite, seek medical care.

​Beat the Heat: Extreme Heat Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention